AP Sports SummaryBrief at 2:07 a.m. EST

Sports

Loss for Messi and Argentina among biggest World Cup upsets

DOHA, Qatar (AP) — The staggering loss for Lionel Messi and Argentina against Saudi Arabia at the World Cup is right up there with the biggest upsets in tournament history. Messi is playing at likely his last World Cup and chasing the one title that has been elusive to him. Messi and his highly-rated team are among the favorites to win the World Cup in Qatar but have an unwanted place on a very different list now.

Ronaldo to leave Manchester United ‘with immediate effect’

DOHA, Qatar (AP) — Manchester United says Cristiano Ronaldo will leave the Premier League club “with immediate effect.” The 37-year-old forward conducted an explosive interview on the eve of the World Cup. He criticized manager Erik ten Hag and the club’s owners. United said last week that it had “initiated appropriate steps” in response to Ronaldo’s comments. United says the club “thanks him for his immense contribution across two spells at Old Trafford.”

Boo Simmons: Nets guard jeered in 1st game in Philly

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Brooklyn Nets guard Ben Simmons got his hostile homecoming in Philadelphia. Simmons was an All-Star guard for the 76ers before back injuries and what he said were mental health issues prompted him to demand a trade. Simmons was booed from the moment he stepped on the court in Philadelphia. Sixers fans also cursed at him. There were some supporters. Simmons was traded last season to the Nets for James Harden. He missed Brooklyn’s first game in Philly last season with an injury.

LSU, USC move up behind UGA, Ohio St, Michigan, TCU in CFP

LSU has moved up to fifth and Southern California is sixth in the College Football Playoff rankings behind Georgia, Ohio State, Michigan and TCU. The top four remained the same for the third straight week, but the teams chasing changed order after Tennessee lost to South Carolina last Saturday night. Two huge games this weekend could create more clarity. Michigan is at Ohio State and USC hosts Notre Dame, which checked in at 15th in the selection committee’s rankings.

Jury: NCAA not to blame in ex-USC football player’s death

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A Los Angeles jury has rejected a claim by the widow of a former USC football player who said the NCAA failed to protect him from repeated head trauma that led to his death. The jury found Tuesday that the NCAA was not negligent in the death of Matthew Gee. Lawyers for the widow of Gee, a linebacker on the 1990 Rose Bowl-winning squad, say he endured an estimated 6,000 hits as a college athlete. They say this caused permanent brain damage and led to cocaine and alcohol abuse, which eventually killed him at age 49. The NCAA said it had nothing to do with his death.

Prayers go on, sometimes out of sight, in prep football

WEST BLOOMFIELD TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — Across America, most high school football seasons are winding down. It will wrap up the first year since the Supreme Court ruled it was OK for a public school coach near Seattle to pray on the field. The decision prompted speculation that prayer would become an even bigger part of the game-day fabric, though that hasn’t seemed to be the case. Outside Detroit, coaches have found ways for their diverse rosters to pray if they wish. Some keep it behind closed doors to avoid potential anti-Islamic jeers from fans in other communities.

Tiger Woods wins $15M in PGA Tour’s Player Impact Program

Tiger Woods played nine rounds this year in the majors. That was enough for him to win $15 million from the PGA Tour’s Player Impact Program. The tour sent a memo to players Tuesday with the final tally. Woods ranked No. 1 in four of the five metrics. The exception was how much he was on TV during the weekend. He played the weekend at the Masters and Saturday at the PGA Championship. Rory McIlroy was second, followed by Jordan Spieth, Justin Thomas and Jon Rahm. In all, 23 players earned money from the $106 million bonus pool.

Once forbidden, gambling now embraced by NFL

Gambling has gone from the forbidden topic in the NFL to a key part of the league’s present and future. The days of lobbying against widespread legalized sports betting, preventing broadcast partners from even discussing point spreads and even prohibiting players from holding a fantasy football convention because it was at a casino are firmly in the past. The relationship between the United States’ richest sports league and gambling is stronger than ever with a team playing in Las Vegas just a short walk from the casinos on The Strip, sponsorship deals with gambling companies who pay millions for in-game advertisements and teams having sports books next to their stadiums.

Verlander, Pujols voted Comeback Players of the Year

NEW YORK (AP) — Houston Astros ace Justin Verlander and St. Louis Cardinals slugger Albert Pujols have won baseball’s Comeback Player of the Year awards. Verlander, the American League recipient, returned from Tommy John surgery to lead Houston to its second World Series championship. He had the lowest ERA in the majors and was a unanimous winner of his third Cy Young Award — becoming the first player to earn the prize after not pitching in the previous season. Pujols, honored in the National League, came back to St. Louis for his final season and posted his biggest numbers in years at age 42. The three-time MVP compiled an .895 OPS for the NL Central champions and became the fourth major leaguer to reach 700 career home runs.

Man United owners prepared to sell Premier League club

DOHA, Qatar (AP) — Manchester United owners the Glazer family have confirmed they will consider putting the Premier League club up for sale. United says it will explore outside funding to enhance growth — a move that could pave the way to a potential buyout. The club says that “the board will consider all strategic alternatives, including new investment into the club, a sale, or other transactions involving the company.” The late tycoon Malcolm Glazer bought United in 2005 for 790 million pounds (then about $1.4 billion). Fans have been critical of the leveraged nature of the buyout that loaded debt onto the club, as well as a perceived lack of investment and the dividends taken out by owners.